Thursday, January 20, 2011

"cute, but not too Innocent" art unit lesson plan

Lesson Plan Unit by Kathy Grimm
Broader Topic: Packaging Parody & Satire
Title of The Unit Lesson: "Cute, But Not Too Innocent"
Goals of unit:
  • Students identify the use of parody and satire in films created for their entertainment and education.
  • Students identify the values they share in common with teens from other time periods.
  • Students make connections between literary terms and visual culture.
  • Students make connections between social agendas and visual culture.
  • Students participate in meaningful drawing activities that reflect their willingness to communicate important themes they have learned through observation.
Objective of unit:
  • Students will be able to identify the characteristics of parody in teen film.
  • Students will be able to describe the function of satire used in a film character.
  • Students will be able to draw a character prototype and demonstrate through written words "how" their visual portrait is not as he or she appears.
  • Students will be able to describe how connections are made between visual satire and established cultural norms.
  • Students will be able to discuss historical references to costume.
  • Students will be able to reflect upon the differences between culture and time when represented in the context of a parody. 
Grade range: 7th-12th Grade
Show-Me Standards:
  • VA1 - Artists communicate ideas through artworks by selecting and applying media techniques and processes, subject matter, and themes.
  • VA3 - Viewer's respond aesthetically to artworks based upon their personal experience and cultural values. Viewers analyze, interpret, and evaluate the quality of artwork through art criticism.
  • VA4 - Visual art is connecting to performing arts, math, science, and social studies.
  • VA6 - Making connections between visual arts and other disciplines.
GLE's: 
  • PP.3.C.7 Communicate ideas about subject matter and themes in artworks created for various purposes. Theme. Create an original artwork that communicates ideas about the themes of Group Identity.
  • PP.3.C.8 Communicate ideas about subject matter and themes in artworks created for various purposes. Theme. Create an original artwork that communicates ideas through themes about power and illusion.
  • PP.3.C.9 Communicate ideas about subject matter and themes in artworks created for various purposes. Theme. Create original artwork that communicates ideas through the themes of Cultural Identity and Social Commentary.
  • PP.1.A.7. Select and apply two-dimensional media, techniques, and processes to communicate ideas and solve challenging visual art problems. Drawing. Use a variety of media such as pencil, pastels, color sticks, and/or markers to create simulated/implied texture
  • AP.2.A.8. Analyze and evaluate art using art vocabulary. Art Criticism. Describe artwork in detail that serves a purpose in the society or culture.
  • AP.2.A.9.  Analyze and evaluate art using art vocabulary. Art Criticism. With one artwork: Interpret the meaning of the work and the meaning it communicates.
  • IC.1.A.7. Explain connections between visual art and performing arts. Connecting Visual and Performing Arts. Explain how art is used in designing sets in film.
  • IC.2.A.9. Explain the connections between Visual Art and Communication Arts and Social Studies. Connecting Art and Non-Art Subjects. Explain how historical events and social ideas are reflected in artworks from selected cultures or historical time periods.
  • HC.1.A.7. Compare and contrast artworks from different historical time periods and/or cultures. Historical Period or Culture. Identify works of art from the United States.
  • HC.1.B.8. Compare and contrast artworks from different historical time periods and/or cultures. Characteristics of Artworks. Compare and contrast two artworks on: Function of art in culture/society.
Number of classes needed for lesson: Eleven 55 min. class periods
Length & frequency of class: Middle School 55 min. in length meeting daily
Vocabulary terms:
  1. Visual Parody - to imitate a serious piece of art, photography, or writing for the purpose of ridicule, criticism, or humor through visual images, fine art, film, or literature
  2. Cute - "Cuteness is usually characterized by (though not limited to) some combination of infant-like physical traits, especially small body size with a disproportionately large head, large eyes, a pleasantly fair, though not necessarily small nose, dimples, and round and softer body features. Infantile personality traits, such as playfulness, fragility, helplessness, curiosity, innocence, affectionate behavior, and a need to be nurtured are also generally considered cute." Wikipedia
  3. Macabre - in art, visual representations or ideas resembling those things associated with death or gruesome, ghastly or grim imagery
  4. Visual Satire - the use of irony, sarcasm, or humor to attack or expose human vice or stupidity through visual representations in artworks, film or literature
  5. Packaging (in art) - The manner in which a person, proposal, place or product is presented to the public through visual images, film, literature, or fine art.
  6. Goth - Goth is a slang expression referring to young people who fall under one or more of the following categories attributed to the term: quiet misfits who are often focused on the darker side of life, often wear black, listen to heavy metal music, punk-derived subculture of people.
  7. Prototype - A prototype is a standard or typical example of something or someone.
  8. Film Industry - The film industry produces and distributes movies to the public, individuals, or private organizations.
  9. Value System - Value systems are defined by the principles of right and wrong that are accepted by an individual or a social group.
  10. Hallmark - A hallmark is a distinctive characteristic or attribute of a person, place, or thing.

Resources (used & suggested for teaching):
Internet site resources:
Internet Video:
  1. Through Tim Burton's Looking Glass: Making Alice in Wonderland - http://www.wired.com/underwire/2010/03/wonderland-tech-tricks/
  2. Tate Shots NYC: Jeff Koons' studio and interview -http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XTnPq0uIUds&feature=related
  3. "Hairspray" is a film parody of 1950 films, here is the trailer http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=V07KB3ij9gY
  4. Zac Efron's sings "Without Love" his character is "Lake" and Amanda Bynes who plays "Penny" http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-n3qmXj29wQ&feature=related
  5. Brittany Snow sings "Nicest Kids in Town" her character is "Amber" 
  6. Jack sings "What's This" from "The Nightmare Before Christmas" http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZuWD-mSUtrU&feature=related
  7. Sally sings her song from "The Nightmare Before Christmas" http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=39awVQQ7MIc&feature=related
  8. Jack's Lament from "The Nightmare Before Christmas"http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Wv1HX80u5x4&feature=related 

Brief order of activities in unit & time required for each: 
Day One: 
  • The teacher will present the visual culture site through a series of questions based upon the "Wanted Dead of Alive Poster" and the "Metal of Honor" activities. (55 min.)
Day Two
  • Students will view selections from the "Hairspray" film (35 min.)
  • Students will then split up into smaller groups and fill out a worksheet that has questions about the film selections (20 min.)
Day Three
  • Students will view selections from "The Nightmare Before Christmas" film (35 min.)
  • Students will then split up into smaller groups and fill out a worksheet that has questions about the film selections (20 min.)
Day Four
  • The teacher then reviews the cultural site with the class in the form of a grand conversation. While this is taking place, a series of images on a power point are shown in order to stimulate class discussion about the characters in "Hairspray" and "The Nightmare Before Christmas" (30 min.)
  • The teacher then introduces the studio assignment (25 min.)
Day Five
  • The teacher shows a interview of the artist, Tim Burton (5 minutes, 19 seconds)
  • Student's will begin to design and draw plans related to their studio project. (34 minutes)
  • Clean Up (2 minutes)
Day Six
  • The teacher introduces the artist, James Rizzi by showing his agent's web pages and viewing a slide of his work from the power point and there will be a brief discussion about "how" James Rizzi's work relates to our topic.(15 minutes)
  • Student's will design and draw plans related to their studio project. (35 minutes)
  • Clean Up (5 minutes)
Day Seven
  • The teacher introduces the artist, Jeff Koons by showing a film interview and viewing a slide of his work from the power point and there will be a brief discussion about "how" Jeff Koon's work relates to our topic. (20 minutes)
  • Student's will work on their studio project. (30 minutes)
  • Clean Up (5 minutes)
Day Eight
  • The teacher introduces illustrator, Bob Staake by visiting his website and viewing a slide of his work from the power point and there will be a brief discussion about "how" Jeff Koon's work relates to our topic.(20 minutes)
  • Student's will work on their studio project.(30 minutes)
  • Clean Up (5 minutes)
Day Nine
  • Teacher will share the "Cute & Dangerous Art Exhibit" from an online website with the class. (15 minutes)
  • Student's will work on their studio project. (35 minutes)
  • Clean Up (5 minutes)
Day Ten
  • The entire 55 minutes will be devoted to finishing up the satire art project excluding... 
  •  2 or 3 minutes set aside for clean up.
Day Eleven
  • Formal Class Review (55 minutes)
  • 1 minute dismiss class


Specifics For Each Daily Film Activity
Activity for Day 1: Series of questions to initiate dialogue: The following questions are designed to teach abstract concepts about visual satire by first reviewing the obvious concept of illustrating a person under the assumption that he or she will "look" like a bad person, if they are a bad person and he will "look" like a good guy, is he is a good guy. After doing this exercise, the teacher would then ask the students another set of questions to demonstrate "how" an author and/or director develops a "visual satire." 
First Set of Questions:
  • Have you ever thought of "how" you might draw a bad guy's face?
  • What kinds of characteristics might you give him?
  • What would he wear?
  • How would his face look?
  • How would you draw this person in order to make others fear him?
      Think of a bad person from a film that you have seen and pretend that you are responsible for communicating his or her "wicked" face to those who will capture and bring him in for trial.  
Second Set of Questions.
  • How will you depict an attractive person?
  • What kinds of facial features would you give a good person?
  • What types of cloths would this person of excellent reputation wear?     
      Now draw the most heroic person you have ever heard of. The teacher will select from the drawings with the aid of his students, the worst looking bad guy and the best looking good guy drawings. The teacher then tapes these onto the chalkboard and asks the students to write underneath the drawings the evil traits they believe would be most associated with each character. Then after the students have been seated again, the teacher switches the drawings so that the wanted poster now has a list of good attributes listed beneath his portrait. Likewise, the hero now has the evil attributes listed beneath his portrait. Now the teacher should explain to his students that their drawings have been made into "visual satires." Pretend that you are a director who must portray a "bad guy" as a very physically attractive person. Suddenly you are faced with a interesting problem. 
Third Set of Questions:
  • How would a film director convince his audience that a beautiful looking person is in fact very evil inside?
  • How would a film director convince his audience that an ugly character is very good on the inside?
  • Why do you think a film director or writer would use this concept in the development of a character?
  • How do we remember "what" the definition of a visual satire is? 

Activity for Day Two: Answer the following questions in your small groups together and be prepared to share your answers with the whole class in about ten minutes following the "Hairspray" film selections.
  1. Identify three characters who you believe best represent "visual satire"
  2. List five attributes of each teen that best describe their emotional, moral, or intellectual characteristics.
  3. Why do you think the play write chose to craft these particular characters as "visual satire?"
  4. Can you list three characters from the film that are not "visual satire?" These people would look exactly as they act.
  5. Explain why you chose these three characters.

Activity for Day Three: Answer the following questions in your small groups together and be prepared to share your answers with the whole class in about ten minutes following the "Nightmare Before Christmas" film selections.
  1. Identify two characters who you believe best represent "visual satire"
  2. List five attributes of each character that best describe their emotional, moral, or intellectual characteristics.
  3. Why do you think Tim Burton chose to craft these particular characters as "visual satire?''
  4. Can you list three characters from the film that are not "visual satire?" These people would look exactly as they act.
  5. Explain why you chose these three characters.
Create a PowerPoint to show your selected artwork and to use in your discussion & activity. My PowerPoint about the visual culture lesson. This includes a review and artist sample slides for discussion. 
Artwork #1: "New York Is My Castle", James Rizzi, Size: 19.5 in. tall, Base 12 x 10 inchesPainted Resin Sculpture, Signature and Number Inscribed
Artwork #1 Description - James Rizzi is an American born artist but his work is best received in Germany. He works primarily with traditional media like painting and sculpture. Sometimes Rizzi works with building facades too. I chose this work by Rizzi because it is not as controversial as other artworks by him. Rizzi rarely produces parody, but frequently his work is laced with visual satire. In this sculpture Rizzi depicts the city as a happy place without any dangers. Although I would never type-cast Rizzi as a skeptic, he definitely "white washes" sensitive subject matter with childlike graphics. The appeal of his work is the cartoon like simplicity he uses to interpret all of his topics of interest. Rizzi goes heavy on the "cuteness factor" but never avoids current issues like gay marriage, sporty sex, politics, etc..... As a classroom teacher, however, my hands are tied in terms of the 'what' I use for this particular artist. Talking about 'how' the city is represented is a popular topic for Rizzi and Western Europeans as well. It is also a relatively broad, safe topic for a classroom of seventh through ninth graders. It affords multiple perspectives and ideas for younger students to expand upon.
Discussion of Artist & Artwork and how it relates to them.
Questions about artwork/theme (8-10 questions)  to stimulate critical thinking and dialogue.
  1. What are the attributes in this graphic that you believe define cute?
  2. Have you seen images like this before?
  3. How does it make you feel?
  4. Is there a specific group of people that you believe this artist is trying to appeal to?
  5. What are some of the reasons do you think this artist may have for creating an image like this one?
  6. If you were going to put this artwork on a product, what product would you apply it to?
  7. What do you believe the artist is trying to say with this image?
  8. Could you say something serious with this kind of cute image or do you think that whoever saw it would immediately dismiss it as silly?
  9. Would you call this artwork a parody or a satire?
Artwork #2: "String of Puppies", Jeff Koons, 62 x 37 ins., wood painted sculpture.
Artwork #2 Description - Koons is one of those artists who loves to act as though he is completely naive of "what" he is doing. He reminds me of Jackson Pollock. He isn't, however, as dumb or innocent as many interviews with him project. Koons work is visual satire because it comes across as innocent and playful but is in fact quite serious. He also has a tendency to demonstrate content as comical parody in general; however, the above selection is not a parody. How can anyone take the sculpture above to be serious you might ask? Have you ever known people who surround themselves with cute little pets and want nothing to do with the outside world? We're not talking about "dog lovers", we're talking about people who cannot relate to anyone but animals alone. Their social skills are seriously lacking to the extreme. These folks represent those who can not deal with mature topics and the problems of life for longer than ten minutes without losing self-control. Ahhh, yes, the eternal children of our culture. Only in America can you ignore the problems of the world and squeeze your cute, little blue litter of puppies till you die in your big pink buffer zone! David Burns made a film based entirely on this topic, but I digress.
Discussion of Artist & Artwork and how it relates to them.
Questions about artwork/theme (8-10 questions)  to stimulate critical thinking and dialogue.
  1. What are the attributes in this graphic that you believe define cute?
  2. Have you seen images like this before?
  3. How does it make you feel?
  4. Is there a specific group of people that you believe this artist is trying to appeal to?
  5. What are some of the reasons do you think this artist may have for creating an image like this one?
  6. If you were going to put this artwork on a product, what product would you apply it to?
  7. What do you believe the artist is trying to say with this image?
  8. Could you say something serious with this kind of cute image or do you think that whoever saw it would immediately dismiss it as silly?
  9. Would you call this artwork a parody or a satire?
Artwork #3: "Baby face", Bob Staake
Artwork #3 Description - I chose this piece by Staake because of it's simple geometric design and humor. Children are often drawn to these attributes in an artwork. I think that everyone can agree that the "cuteness factor" of this particular grouping of graphics is way over the top! Staake developed this graphic for baby product. Staake always depicts his subjects as 'cute' even very serious subjects with adult content. The geometric, rounded forms are parody of many illustrators of the 1930's and 40's, a time in American culture when nothing was ever said publicly without polite words or with mere hints at it's seriousness. Open discourse about sexual or violent topics was forbidden in polite society. I chose a children's topic here in order to avoid too much exposure to that which I might get censured for in a public classroom. I was able to do this with Staake because he produces visual satires that are age appropriate as well as interesting and entertaining to adults.
      In this particular piece, babies are given very cute and appealing physical attributes but, in truth the words below explain the serious nature of their emotional needs. Although babies are generally thought to be cute, caring for one while he is screaming and crying is quite stressful. In this respect Staake's cute baby graphics are visual satire all the way!
      Much of this illustrator's appeal is successful based upon his ability to appeal to adults as well as children. He frequently illustrates very serious subjects with these same simple childlike illustrations. His work reaches a very broad audience and he has been popular with adult readers as well as children for many years. 
Discussion of Artist & Artwork and how it relates to them. Staake is a famous American cartoonist and illustrator. He is primarily known for his children's books and magazine article illustrations. Staake has been employed by some very reputable publishers like: The Washington Post, The New Yorker and has also worked with toy companies like Kenner to develop product design and concepts.
Questions about artwork/theme (8-10 questions)  to stimulate critical thinking and dialogue.
  1. What are the attributes in this graphic that you believe define cute?
  2. Have you seen images like this before?
  3. How does it make you feel?
  4. Is there a specific group of people that you believe this artist is trying to appeal to?
  5. What are some of the reasons do you think this artist may have for creating an image like this one?
  6. If you were going to put this artwork on a product, what product would you apply it to?
  7. What do you believe the artist is trying to say with this image?
  8. Could you say something serious with this kind of cute image or do you think that whoever saw it would immediately dismiss it as silly?
  9. Would you call this artwork a parody or a satire?

Studio Lesson Title: "A Portrait of Satire"
Studio lesson goals:
  • Students participate in meaningful drawing activities that reflect their willingness to communicate important themes they have learned through observation. (5th goal listed on cover sheet)
Studio lesson objectives:
  • Students will be able to draw a character prototype and demonstrate through written words "how" their visual portrait is not as he or she appears. (3rd objective listed on cover sheet)
Time required for studio lesson: Approximately four hours of classroom time is devoted to the completion of this studio art assignment. Students may take projects home and invest more time in them if they choose to do so.
List of materials (type and quantity):
  1. approximately 10x14 inch white poster board for finished drawing per student
  2. a variety of pens, markers, colored pencils from the supply closet for each table in the classroom
  3. photographs may be collaged into the drawing as well (supply of magazines from supply closet)
Vocabulary w/ definitions for studio lesson:
  • Packaging (in art) - The manner in which a person, proposal, place or product is presented to the public through visual images, film, literature, or fine art.
  • Prototype - A prototype is a standard or typical example of something or someone.
Facility & equipment needs:
  1. large tables and chairs for students to work at
Length of time expected for each step within activity: The lengths of time expected for each activity vary and are listed below because they are different for each day and step. However, that being said, I have included a general listing of time needed for activities just below.
  • Discussions about the concepts surrounding parody and satire take up an entire session the first day and approximately 30 minutes on the following two days, and then approximately 15 minutes on the remaining days excluding the tenth day.
  • Students are given approximately five days of 30 minute periods to work on their projects excluding one period when I am demonstrating and explaining the studio project.
  • Students are given one whole 55 minute period on the tenth day to finish their drawing altogether without interruptions.
Step-by-step activity: 
Day One: 
  1. Introduction: The teacher will present the visual culture site through a series of questions based upon the "Wanted Dead of Alive Poster" and the "Metal of Honor" activities. (53 min.) He will need to have a copy of both a "wanted" poster and a "metal of honor" poster printed for each student to draw upon. I have two versions of these for our class to use during our demonstration. However, the two that I have are copyrighted and I am not allowed to post these on the web. I will make my own samples at a later date. I have written a detailed description of 'how' this activity is played out under the Beginning Questions page as well.
  2. Daily Wrap-Up: 2 minutes to clean up and prepare to leave classroom
Day Two
       1. Introduction: Students will view selections from the "Hairspray" film (35 min.)
       2. Students will then split up into smaller groups and fill out a worksheet that has questions about the film selections (18 min.) 
Activity for Day Two: Answer the following questions in your small groups together and be prepared to share your answers with the whole class in about ten minutes following the "Hairspray" film selections.
  • Identify three characters who you believe best represent "visual satire"
  • List five attributes of each teen that best describe their emotional, moral, or intellectual characteristics.
  • Why do you think the play write chose to craft these particular characters as "visual satire?"
  • Can you list three characters from the film that are not "visual satire?" These people would look exactly as they act.
  • Explain why you chose these three characters.
      3. Daily Wrap-Up: 2 minutes to clean up and prepare to leave classroom
Day Three
       1. Introduction: Students will view selections from "The Nightmare Before Christmas" film (35 min.)
      2.Students will then split up into smaller groups and fill out a worksheet that has questions about the film selections (18 min.) 
Activity for Day Three: Answer the following questions in your small groups together and be prepared to share your answers with the whole class in about ten minutes following the "Nightmare Before Christmas" film selections.
  • Identify two characters who you believe best represent "visual satire"
  • List five attributes of each character that best describe their emotional, moral, or intellectual characteristics.
  • Why do you think Tim Burton chose to craft these particular characters as "visual satire?''
  • Can you list three characters from the film that are not "visual satire?" These people would look exactly as they act.
  • Explain why you chose these three characters.
      3. Daily Wrap-Up: 2 minutes to clean up and prepare to leave classroom
Day Four
     1. Review: The teacher then reviews the cultural site with the class in the form of a grand conversation. While this is taking place, a series of images on a power point are shown in order to stimulate class discussion about the characters in "Hairspray" and "The Nightmare Before Christmas" (28 min.)
     2. The teacher then introduces the studio assignment (25 min.) This is the step-by-step lesson for the studio project:
  • Determine which character from either the films discussed in class or one of your own choosing you believe to be a ''visual satire.'' I will be talking with each of you to make sure that you understand your selection during the demonstration in order to insure that you select an appropriate character.
  • Observe carefully the samples of "portrait satires" displayed on the table at the front of the class.
  • Each student will need an 10''x14'' sheet of white cardstock and a collection of drawing materials to complete the project.
  • Determine if you would like your drawing to have a window, a door, an attached piece with a brad or a pocket to contain or cover the list of words that best describe your character.
  • Draw out a portrait design of your character with very light sketches. Students will need to be able to alter and change designs a bit before committing to one singular idea.
  • Compile also a list on a separate sheet of notebook paper. This list should describe the true "nature" of your visual satire. Students will be writing out these expressions, poems, vocabulary, etc.... behind the portrait inside of a window, door, pocket or behind a spinning paper portrait attached with a brad. I have samples of all of these drawing prototypes to show students the kinds of possible designs that may be accomplished with a little manipulation.
     3. Daily Wrap-Up: 2 minutes to clean up and prepare to leave classroom
Day Five
  1. Introduction: The teacher shows a interview of the artist, Tim Burton (5 minutes, 19 seconds)
  2. Student's will begin to design and draw plans related to their studio project. (34 minutes)
  3. Daily Wrap-Up: Clean Up (2 minutes)
Day Six
  1. Introduction: The teacher introduces the artist, James Rizzi by showing his agent's web pages and viewing a slide of his work from the power point and there will be a brief discussion about "how" James Rizzi's work relates to our topic.(15 minutes)
  2. Student's will design and draw plans related to their studio project. (35 minutes)
  3. Daily Wrap-Up: Clean Up (5 minutes)
Day Seven
  1. Introduction: The teacher introduces the artist ,Jeff Koons by showing a film interview and viewing a slide of his work from the power point and there will be a brief discussion about "how" Jeff Koon's work relates to our topic. (20 minutes)
  2. Student's will work on their studio project. (30 minutes)
  3. Daily Wrap-Up: Clean Up (5 minutes)
Day Eight
  1. Introduction: The teacher introduces illustrator, Bob Staake by visiting his website and viewing a slide of his work from the power point and there will be a brief discussion about "how" Jeff Koon's work relates to our topic.(20 minutes)
  2. Student's will work on their studio project.(30 minutes)
  3. Daily Wrap-Up: Clean Up (5 minutes)
Day Nine
  1. Introduction: Teacher will share the "Cute & Dangerous Art Exhibit" with the class. (15 minutes)
  2. Student's will work on their studio project. (35 minutes)
  3. Daily Wrap-Up: Clean Up (5 minutes)
Day Ten
  1. Introduction: Students will be instructed that their project is due by the end of the class period.
  2. The entire 55 minutes will be devoted to finishing up the satire art project excluding... 
  3.  Daily Wrap-Up:2 or 3 minutes set aside for clean up.
Day Eleven
  1. Review of Student's studio activity and presentations
  2. Daily Wrap-Up: 1 minute to dismiss
Clean up time & strategy: This particular studio project is not a messy one. The students will only need to put away their drawing materials and wipe down their desks before leaving for their next class.
Health &/or safety concerns: There are no safety concerns for this project.
Assessment plan for studio assignment w/ appropriate documents: I will be using an informal assessment and will also take notes during the completion of the projects. The grades will be posted online for the students to see. Below is a list of criteria that I will be looking for while assessing the student's grades.
  1. The selection of a satirical character from their choice of film which would be approved by the instructor. This selection is done early in the project lesson but it is very important to the successful nature of the project. The more accurate the student’s selection, the better his or her visual satire.
  2. An accurate list of vocabulary, definitions, poem, or phrases that interpret the behaviors of that visual satire the student has selected to draw a portrait of. This is the list of words included on the drawing that describe the visual satire.
  3. Whether or not the particular portrait of the character is articulated creatively or with care to it's depiction through "craftsmanship"
  4. The thoughtful inclusion of a elements in the portraits background which may include other literary elements such as: narration, foreshadowing, or symbols associated with the "visual irony" concept or beliefs the character may hold of life or others.
Student Self-Assessment: 
  • The students will be asked to share their projects with the whole class and speak about "how" their drawings reflect "visual satire" during a formal class discussion period.
An alternative view of the teacher 
sample example of the studio project
 is pictured below.
For Teachers To Review:
Visual Culture Site Investigated: teen film, specific examples include scenes from "Hairspray" and "The Nightmare Before Christmas"
Information needed to understand site from historical or cultural perspective:
  • Review for parents about the film, I actually never show the seduction scene in the film. As contemporary film goes, this serious content is not at all extreme. The review is written from a conservative point of view. The moral content of this film is excellent but it must be viewed as both a parody and a satire. Film must be evaluated within it's genre, as should any other type of artwork, in order to understand it's content appropriately.  http://kidstvmovies.about.com/od/hairspray/fr/hairsprayr.htm
  • New Line Cinema "Hairspray" synopsis, production notes, and photos http://www.newline.com/properties/hairspray.html
Websites that clearly define concepts about my visual culture theme in general:
Websites that address some cultural or historical perspectives about the works of art I have chosen that may be addressed in the classroom:
The following websites are for the instructor and the issues surround the artists. Teachers are sometimes asked sensitive questions about artworks by a more educated student. Sometimes it's best to be well informed about these sensitive issues and the articles below are for this.
These links are to film clips for the use of the project or the review of the films should the teacher not own the films and wish to give them a quick review. I happen to have copies of the films being discussed.
Informative but not necessary websites. These could be discussed on day eleven during critique as added interest to the project.
  • A New Twist On Art Therapy: Contemporary Art In Hospitals - quot;http://modernhomemodernbaby.com/a-new-twist-on-art-therapy-contemporary-art-in-hospitals/">http://modernhomemodernbaby.com/a-new-twist-on-art-therapy-contemporary-art-in-hospitals/
  • "Kayart.net is dedicated to the creation of cute art, because the most important forms of art are those arts which help bring joy to your new life" - http://www.kayart.net/ (This merchant is serious)
Questions prompting critical inquiry into site (8-10 questions):
  1. Can I create a presentation that clearly identifies to my students the difference between parody and satire in artworks without offending their unique individual beliefs?
  2. Is there information that may be considered confrontational, politically incorrect or pornographic attached to the artists I have chosen to discuss with my students and how might I avoid showing any of it during a classroom presentation?
  3. Who are the most important fine artists in my own contemporary culture that I might identify with "cute" but serious content similar to these concepts explored in the film, "Hairspray?"
  4. Do parents take seriously the deeper levels of exploration needed in order for their children to become better equipped at evaluating and critically analyzing the hyper media culture in which they live in and are exposed to every day?
  5. Will I need to send a letter home with students requesting the permission to show film selections to their children? If I do, where will I put students during the film presentation?
  6. What forms of supplemental literacy homework can be given to those students who are not allowed to view the film?
  7. Are topics about parody and satire to advanced for my students?
  8. What are the book reading requirements of my school district? Are these as restricting as the film regulations?
  9. Is my topic of choice taught in any other classroom (social studies, relationships, literature)  in my district and what are their standards of application?
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all articles and lesson plans are copyrighted 2011 by Grimm