Monday, July 25, 2011

portrait of a survivor lesson plan


(Max Beckman's "The Sinking of The Titanic" was completed in time for an exhibition in 1913, approximately one year after the ocean liner was lost at sea. The giant painting will again be on display at the St. Louis Art Museum in the Fall of 2011.)

Title of Lesson: “Portrait of A Survivor”
Topic: What motivates a painter? A portrait assignment integrated with eyewitness accounts of the historical sinking of the Titanic and the incredible artwork of the world-renowned artist, Max Beckman.
Integrated Subjects: Art History, Fine Art, Communication Arts
Grade Level: 6th – 12th
Length of Class Period: 55 min.
Time Needed: 4-5 days
Goals & Objectives:
  • Students will read the eyewitness accounts that influenced Max Beckman’s artwork, “The Sinking of The Titanic.”
  • While reflecting upon the feelings of others, students will gain a greater understanding of the struggles between man and nature.
  • Students will learn the significant details of an important event in maritime history.
  • Students will use hands-on, collage techniques to demonstrate the elements: value and shape and the principles: unity, repetition and emphasis. 
  • Students will write a descriptive, personal narrative that is influenced by the newspaper accounts, painting by Max Beckman and their small and large group discussions.
Show-Me Standards: Fine Arts -In Fine Arts, students in Missouri public schools will acquire a solid foundation that includes knowledge of
1. Process and techniques for the production, exhibition or performance of one or more of the visual or performed arts
2. The principles and elements of different art forms
3. The vocabulary to explain perceptions about and evaluations of works in dance, music, theater and visual arts
4. Interrelationships of visual and performing arts and the relationships of the arts to other disciplines
5. Visual and performing arts in historical and cultural contexts
National Standards:
VA 1 ,  VA 2 , VA 4
Grade-Level Expectations: Visual Arts
Strand I : Product/Performance : 3. Communicate ideas about subject matter and themes in artworks created for various purposes.
A. Subject Matter: Fine Art:
  • Grade 6 - Create original artwork using a realistic or abstract portrait
  • Grade 7 – Create original artwork using a human figure
  • Grade 9 – Create original artwork using a portrait
  • Grade 10 – Communicate ideas through the creation of a portrait
  • Grade 11 – Combine subject matter in original artworks to communicate ideas about the human figure
  • Grade 12 – Select subject matter to communicate personal ideas through a series of original, related works (This means that if you are using the lesson plan here for 12 graders, teachers must use both combinations of creative writing and artworks to meet this standard.)
C. Theme:
  • Grade 6 – Create an original artwork that communicates ideas about the function of art in culture or personal identity
  • Grade 7 – Create an original artwork that communicates ideas about group identity or nature
  • Grade 8 - Create an original artwork that communicates ideas about Environment or Time
  • Grade 9 - Create an original artwork that communicates ideas about identity, power, time, nature, or illusion
  • Grade 10 - Create an original artwork that communicates ideas about cultural identity, social commentary, reflection/transparency
  • Grade 11 - Create an original artwork that communicates ideas about national identity, spirituality, vision, progress, human condition, narrative
  • Grade 12 - Create an original artwork that communicates ideas about complex visual and/or conceptual ideas, imaginative or inventive approaches, and/or demonstrates risk taking
Strand II: Elements and Principles. 1. Select and use elements of art for their effect in communicating ideas through artwork
B. Shapes
  • Grade 6 – Identify and use complex shapes such as people
  • Grade 7 – Identify and use rhythmic shapes
  • Grade 8 – Identify and use varied shapes
  • Grade 9 – Differentiate between and use geometric and organic shapes
  • Grade 10 – Identify and use complex shapes
  • Grade 11 – Identify and use implied shapes
  • Grade 12 – Use shapes expressively to communicate ideas
F. Value
  • Grade 6 – Identify and demonstrate shades and tints
  • Grade 8 – Identify and use a range of values
  • Grade 9 – Identify and use a range of values to create the illusion of simple forms
  • Grade 10 – Identify and use a range of values to create the illusion of complex forms
  • Grade 11 – Identify and use a range of values to create the illusion of form through observation of transparent and reflective objects (In other words, students should also illustrate portrait of survivor and include a watery surface along with it.)
  • Grade 12 – Use value expressively to communicate ideas
Strand II: Elements and Principles. 2. Select and use principles of art for their effect in communicating ideas through artwork
B. Emphasis
· Grade 7 – Identify and use center of interest (focal point)
· Grade 9 – Identify and create emphasis through contrast and convergence
· Grade 10 – Identify and use emphasis through isolation and location
· Grade 11 – Use emphasis to support the communication of an idea
· Grade 12 – Use emphasis expressively
D. Rhythm/Repetition
· Grade 7 – Identify and use regular rhythm
· Grade 8 – Identify and use progressive rhythm
· Grade 9 – Identify and use elements to create regular rhythm
· Grade 10 – Identify and use elements to create progressive rhythm
· Grade 11 – Use rhythm to support the communication of an idea
· Grade 12 – Use rhythm expressively
E. Unity
· Grade 9 – Explain how elements and principles create unity in artworks
· Grade 10 – Identify and create unity through elements and principles
· Grade 11 – Use unity to support the communication of an idea
· Grade 12 – Use unity to support the personal expression of an idea
Strand V:  Historical and Cultural Contexts. 1. Compare and contrast artworks from different historical time periods and/or cultures
A. Historical Period or Culture:
·      Grade 7 – Identify works of art from Europe
·      Grade 11 – Identify artworks from German Expressionism
Show-Me Standards: Communication Arts - In Communication Arts, students in Missouri public schools will acquire a solid foundation that includes knowledge of and proficiency in
3. Reading and evaluating nonfiction works and material (such as biographies, newspapers, technical manuals)
4. Writing formally (such as reports, narratives, essays) and informally (such as outlines, notes)
5. Comprehending and evaluating the content and artistic aspects of oral and visual presentations (such as story-telling, debates, lectures, multi-media productions)
6. Participating in formal and informal presentations and discussions of issues and ideas
FR: I 6a-c, 5-12
FR: I 1b, e, 5a-c, II 1c, f, III 2d, e, IV 2b-c, 5-8 and I 1b-d, 4a-b, 5a-c, 6d, II 1d, III 2c & d, 3e, 4e, IV 2b-c, 9-12
FR: I 1d-c, 3c, II 1b, 1d, 2a, 1e, III 1a, g-h, 2a-b, IV 2b-c, 5-8 and I 1a-d, 4a, 6d, III 1a,e & h, 2a-c, 3a-d, 1h, IV 2b, 9-12
FR: I 1c-d, 3a-c, f, III 3e, 5-8 and I 1d, 3a, d, f, III 1a, e, f, & h, 3h & IV 2a, 3a, 1f, 9-12
FR: I 6a, 5-8
FR: II 6d, III 4c, IV 3f, 5-8 and II 4e, 3a, 9-12
Grade-Level Expectations: Communication Arts: Reading
1. Develop and apply skills and strategies to the reading process
H: Post-Reading: Grades 6-12 – Apply post-reading skills to comprehend and interpret text: question to clarify, reflect, analyze, draw conclusions, summarize, and paraphrase
I: Making Connections: Grades 6-12 - Compare, contrast, analyze and evaluate connections between: information and relationships in various fiction and non-fiction works, text ideas and own experiences, text ideas and the world by analyzing and evaluating the relationship between literature and its historical period and culture
2. Develop and apply skill and strategies to comprehend, analyze and evaluate fiction, poetry and drama from a variety of cultures and times
C: Text Elements: Grades 6-12 – Use details from text to : identify plot and sub-plot, theme and various types of conflict, analyze cause and effect, Identify and explain point of view and mood, determine how an incident foreshadows a future event, evaluate the problem-solving processes of characters and the effectiveness of solutions
3. Develop and apply skills and strategies to comprehend, analyze and evaluate nonfiction (such as biographies, newspapers, technical manuals) from a variety of cultures and times
C: Text Elements: Grades 6-12: Use details from text to: evaluate adequacy of evidence presented by author, determine author’s purpose based on text analysis, analyze the text for word choice and connotation, selection of details, organizational effectiveness, accuracy of information, analyze multiple texts, compare and contrast, determine importance of information, analyze author’s viewpoints, identify problem solving processes and explain the effectiveness of solutions
D: Understanding Directions: Grades 6-12: Read and apply multi-step directions to perform complex procedures and/or tasks
Grade-Level Expectations: Communication Arts: Writing
3. Write effectively in various forms and types of writing
A: Narrative and Descriptive Writing: Grade 6: Write a personal narrative that: chronicles a sequence of three or more events and includes sensory detail and dialogue
A: Narrative and Descriptive Writing: Grade 7: Write about personal experiences and revise by adding details and literary devices such as metaphors, analogies and symbols
A: Narrative and Descriptive Writing: Grade 8: Write about personal experiences and revise by adding details and literary devices such as metaphors, analogies and symbols
A: Narrative and Descriptive Writing: Grade 9-12: Write a personal narrative for real-life experiences (e.g., scholarships, applications and post-secondary/ college essays)
Grade-Level Expectations: Communication Arts: Information Literacy
2. Develop and apply effective skills and strategies to analyze and evaluate oral and visual media
A: Media Messages: Grades 6-12: Analyze, describe and evaluate the elements of messages projected in various media (e.g., videos, pictures, web-sites, artwork, plays and/or news programs) Facility & Equipment Requirements:
  • One computer lap-top
  • Room with good lighting
  • Large tables, approximately ten, each seating four students
  • Two sinks
  • Dry erase board
  • Drying racks
  • Cabinets for storage
  • Projector for viewing computer video, CDs and DVDs Resources Needed:
  • Eye-witness graphic organizer
  • Newspaper accounts
  • Power Point about Max Beckman’s “The Sinking of The Titanic” called “Portrait Of A Survivor”
Vocabulary:
  1. Eyewitness account – An account of events from those who watched them unfold personally.
  2. Portrait – To ‘portray’ or represent a person or idea in a artwork, photograph, film or piece of literature.
  3. Profile – Either the depiction of a person from the side or an article describing a person in the contemporary verb usage of the word
  4. Survivor – Is a person who adapts to a circumstance or environment in which others have died
  5. Scenarios – Scenes depicting a sequence of events in a work of art, play, movie or literature.
  6. Environment – In art this describes the conditions in which a person, place, or thing exists.
  7. Narrative Artwork – Artwork that illustrates a specific story.
  8. Maritime –People, places or things having relationship to the sea
  9. Tragedy -A misfortune or tribulation
Looking & Talking Activity: Teachers may download the free jpgs. for a Power Point depicting Max Beckman’s painting, “The Sinking Of The Titanic.” 
Literacy Activity: Teachers may download and print out the eyewitness graphic organizer; each student will need two identical sheets. Students should be divided into small groups and be given a newspaper account of one survivor from the Titanic. I choose create packets about the following survivors of the Titanic tragedy. In each packet I collected three to four newspaper articles, personal facts and sometimes photographs.
  1. Miss Margaret Bechstein Hays
  2. Mrs. Eleanor Genevieve Cassebeer
  3. Clara Jensen
  4. Mrs. Sam Aks (Leah Rosen)
  5. Mr. Olaus Jorgensen Abelseth
  6. Rhoda Abbott
One student should read aloud the newspaper accounts and then all small group participants may work together to answer the following questions on the first graphic organizer. Make sure that each student fills out the worksheet as they discuss the newspaper account together about their survivor in their small group. The questions are as follows:
  1. What was he or she thinking?
  2. What did he or she see?
  3. What did he or she hear?
  4. What did he or she say?
  5. How would you feel under similar conditions?
The fifth question doesn’t have a “right” or “wrong” answer. Students should be candid about how they answer the question. After small group discussions, teachers will then ask each team to share a summary of each newspaper account and a few answers to some of the questions asked of them from their graphic organizer. Students will then be asked to fill out the second copy of their “eye-witness” account as their own personal dramatic account of the Titanic tragedy.  Students may choose to be an adult or child passenger or even a crewmember. This second “eye-witness” account will be used to write a brief newspaper report that will be attached to the studio art assignment.
Eyewitness graphic organizer. Click on the image to 
download the largest possible file.
Art Supplies:
  • Newspapers
  • White glue
  • Scissors
Below are teacher examples of the studio assignment.

Newspaper portrait of "Titanic Survivor"
Close-up of "Titanic Survivor"

Teachers may display artworks by mounting the students portraits 
onto an actual newspaper page. The student's account of their 
experience might be positioned beneath their portrait as well.

Survivors of the Titanic recall their experiences of the sinking, 
accompanied by original photos of the Titanic.
Short clips of 2nd Officer Charles Lightoller, 4th Officer 

Joseph Boxhall, passenger Edith Russell and Cape Race
 wireless operator Walter Gray.